Our People
  • Amy snow biking Our Team

    Steppes Travel is made by the people who work here. Incredible holidays are made possible because of their vast travel experience and the great enthusiasm they bring to their work.

  • Chris Packham Our Tour Experts

    We carefully select our experts based on their knowledge, companionship and influence, ensuring that you can travel with the most knowledgeable leaders in the field.

Justin Wateridge, Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

Justin Wateridge

I have had a lifelong passion for travel which stemmed from growing up in Zambia and the fact that my father instilled in me the wonderful diversity of the world and the importance of understanding people. I saw wealth, I saw poverty. I saw ideals, I saw corruption. I saw breath-taking beauty, I saw ugliness. Above all, I saw the ability of people to cope with not very much but to do so with ingenuity and a smile.

I’m lucky enough to have travelled a lot. It is a privilege I do not take for granted. With every country visited, I learn something new. With every country visited, I meet different peoples. I become less ignorant. I become curious. I learn that underneath the cultural differences of dress, location and religion, we want the same things: stability and education for our children, we care about the same things: friends and family, we laugh about the same things. I learn that we are not so different.

Travel gives us a different sense of perspective. We see life, scenarios through the eyes of others. Travel breaks down barriers, it changes perception and prejudice.

Lamanai Ruins, Belize
Lamanai Ruins, Belize

Lamanai - the best twenty-four hours?

Under six foot is cute. Over six foot is not cute,” said my guide, Ruben, with understated Belizean charm.

Ruben was referring to the capture, survey and release that we would be taking part in that evening as part of research into Morelet’s crocodile. We were in Lamanai in north-western Belize.

Read my blog here

Morungs Tribes,Kohima, Nagaland, India
Kohima, India

The head-hunters of Nagaland

Elephant tusk bracelets adorned their upper arms. Across their left shoulder was an ancient musket not quite of 1870’s vintage when muskets were first introduced by the British replacing bow and arrows or machete, but not far off it. Slung diagonally across from their right shoulder to their left hip was a chung pak, a beautifully embroidered piece of red cloth with yellow and green diamonds, that supported a battered old cane basket on their backs. The basket would once have been used to carry heads and trailing from the basket would have been palm leaves. Heads and palm leaves have been replaced by vegetables and shredded plastic respectively.

Read my blog here

Dog Sledding, Spitsbergen, Svalbard
Dog Sledding, Spitsbergen, Svalbard

Dog sledding in Spitsbergen

The air is charged with the sound of howling huskies. My foot quivers on the snow brake. The dogs in front of me strain against their harnesses.

It’s not a moment for misgivings or second thoughts: either you hold tight as you release the brake and the dogs snap forward, or you’re left behind as the sled races out into the open. I choose to hold on; this time at least.

Read my blog here

Whale shark underwater with snorkeller alongside.
Australia

Looking back at our Steppes Travel Festival at the Royal Geographical Society, London

Children on Dug Out Canoes, Papua New Guinea
Children on the Sepik River

My Travel Advice

  • Travel with a sense of humour
  • Be curious and a collector of experiences
  • Connect worlds

Experiences

Hunting with eagles in Mongolia

I scan the horizon redundantly. Superfluous in that an eagle’s eyesight is seven times more powerful than the human eye. Everywhere I look I am awed by the spectacle. This is cinema on an epic and very personal scale. The scenery is overpowering. The lead characters are charismatic and iconic. At this precise moment, I do not want to be anywhere else on earth.

Climbing a tree in the Peruvian Jungle

“You just put your foot in the strap and stand up,” was Andy’s typically laconic description. “It’s quite straightforward really.”

I looked at him quizzically, McEnroe-esque thoughts running through my mind. What on earth could be straightforward about climbing thirty-five metres up a tree in the middle of the jungle in darkest Peru?

Skeleton coast flying safari

In the late afternoon we circled high and then landed in a tight valley surrounded by mountains – few can make that kind of landing. Andre is one of the most experienced pilots in Namibia, in southern Africa and that is one of the joys of the safari: you can touch down pretty much anywhere.

Let’s chat

Get in touch by phone or email to start creating a trip guaranteed to leave you with stories for a lifetime.

01285 601 784

Why Choose Steppes?

Our knowledge and expertise sets us apart. So too our curiosity. A curiosity of the world and of you, and your passions. It is this that drives us to create a journey that is really bespoke to you.

Are you ready to discover extraordinary?


Why Steppes